How to be a Minister

Helping Christian ministers through training, support services, commissioning, licensing and ordination.

Three reasons why ministers should lead a small group

Church gatherings have taken many forms since Jesus waSmall-Groupslked around Jerusalem with the disciples. The church has gathered in homes, outside, in hidden locations and in cathedrals. Some believers are forced to meet in secret and others broadcast their meetings on television and the internet.

Around the world there are traditional churches, mega churches and small churches that go by a wide range of names. Some of these gatherings are casual and others are very formal. Each model has its strengths, purpose and ability to meet the needs in a culture.

However, the most fruitful format for true discipleship and long term expansion of Christianity comes from the small group format.

Small groups can take a wide range of forms, meet in any number of places and focus on a variety of topics. They may be an outreach of a traditional or mega church, but they can just as easily be the church.

Here are three reasons why you as a pastor or minister should lead a small group;

  1. 1.Small groups are far more intimate than larger church services. These allow for relationships to be built and discipleship to occur. It is very difficult to effectively disciple a new believer or train people in how to become a minister without a small group gathering. The model of discipleship that Jesus set as the standard was relational.
  2. 2.Small groups are very effective at meeting people’s needs. Consider that a small group can support an individual or a family through sickness, grief or through joyful occasions. There is more accountability, more opportunity to speak into a person’s life and more chances of long term relationships being developed.
  3. 3.No matter how you slice it small groups are Biblical and arguably the most Biblical format for church meetings and discipleship. Pastors and church leadership have recognized this for thousands of years. Almost all growing churches are looking for ways to create small groups. These may take the form of discipleship classes, Sunday school or fellowship groups.

The National Conservative Christian Church promotes and supports churches of all sizes, but we emphasize the importance of small groups. If you are considering becoming a minister or if you are already a pastor we would encourage you to use small groups as a way to reach people for Christ and make disciples.

This month’s minister’s candidate conference call will be on small groups. Watch your email for the details.  Hope you can join.

Blessings,

Rev. David M. Smuin

President

www.NCCChurch.org

@DaveSmuin

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Comments 8

Guest - Bill Bennot on Saturday, 19 January 2013 18:46

The fact that the early church began with Jesus and a small group should be evidence enough. Every church plant we have ever been a part of began as a small group. Most research confirms that small groups or teams are the most effective means for advancing a mission. Thanks Dr Dave, the benefits of small groups cannot be overstated.

The fact that the early church began with Jesus and a small group should be evidence enough. Every church plant we have ever been a part of began as a small group. Most research confirms that small groups or teams are the most effective means for advancing a mission. Thanks Dr Dave, the benefits of small groups cannot be overstated.
Guest - Barbara O'Kane on Saturday, 22 December 2012 02:38

I really enjoyed and was enriched by the training by Dr Dave and by this discussion. We have a wonderful Bible Study at work in an Army Lab and it is so helpful and uplifting. We have the best relationships in this group of any we are able to develop in the workplace. I am learning so much about the Bible, discipleship and fellowship from this study.

I really enjoyed and was enriched by the training by Dr Dave and by this discussion. We have a wonderful Bible Study at work in an Army Lab and it is so helpful and uplifting. We have the best relationships in this group of any we are able to develop in the workplace. I am learning so much about the Bible, discipleship and fellowship from this study.
Guest - Sandra Scott on Friday, 21 December 2012 01:29

One small group idea is based on "affinity groups." These groups center around a common interest, like the "Quilting Ladies", already mentioned above. Our church has had affinity small groups based on a variety of interests, such as baking, biking and walking, grilling out, playing darts, camping, scrapbooking, crafts, etc. Affinity groups are sometimes easier to invite neighbors, go-workers and friends to because the emphasis is on the activity, which they might be interested in. I once hosted a women's small group that had to do with "pampering". Every week a member of the group provided a special treat to pamper the ladies. We experienced "sugar scrubs", nail care, massages, facials, etc. It was so fun. And of course, there was always time spent talking about the Lord, and praying together. The sky is the limit when it comes to small group ideas!

One small group idea is based on "affinity groups." These groups center around a common interest, like the "Quilting Ladies", already mentioned above. Our church has had affinity small groups based on a variety of interests, such as baking, biking and walking, grilling out, playing darts, camping, scrapbooking, crafts, etc. Affinity groups are sometimes easier to invite neighbors, go-workers and friends to because the emphasis is on the activity, which they might be interested in. I once hosted a women's small group that had to do with "pampering". Every week a member of the group provided a special treat to pamper the ladies. We experienced "sugar scrubs", nail care, massages, facials, etc. It was so fun. And of course, there was always time spent talking about the Lord, and praying together. The sky is the limit when it comes to small group ideas!
Pastor Dave Smuin on Thursday, 20 December 2012 20:50

I love small groups as well. Have had great success with them in our mens ministry. Also have small groups at homes. Would love to hear ideas for sustaining home groups. Meeting needs would seem to be the answer but would love to hear some thoughts tonight. Time is in such short supply for families today that it is hard to get folks together for sustained period of time. Look forward to discussion tonight...
Ash

I love small groups as well. Have had great success with them in our mens ministry. Also have small groups at homes. Would love to hear ideas for sustaining home groups. Meeting needs would seem to be the answer but would love to hear some thoughts tonight. Time is in such short supply for families today that it is hard to get folks together for sustained period of time. Look forward to discussion tonight... Ash
Pastor Dave Smuin on Thursday, 20 December 2012 04:00

I started out in a small group and close relationship were form that we understood the needs of the people and could be a blessing to them.

I started out in a small group and close relationship were form that we understood the needs of the people and could be a blessing to them.
Guest - Debbie King on Tuesday, 11 December 2012 02:47

Small groups have been a part of my Christian experience for over 20 years. Prior to moving to St. Joseph, I attended a mega-church in KCMO. The messages and teaching was fantastic, but it was difficult to get to know or be known by anyone because there were no real opportunities to do so.

The church we currently attend (in St. Joseph) utilize the small group format for everything from a Men's Workout/Bible Study Group to a small group loving known as the Quilting Ladies/Bible Study.

The small group format provides a non-threatening entry point for unchurched or the curious to meet others with shared interests or needs; produces more effective communication; and promotes the formation of more meaningful relationships.

Small groups have been a part of my Christian experience for over 20 years. Prior to moving to St. Joseph, I attended a mega-church in KCMO. The messages and teaching was fantastic, but it was difficult to get to know or be known by anyone because there were no real opportunities to do so. The church we currently attend (in St. Joseph) utilize the small group format for everything from a Men's Workout/Bible Study Group to a small group loving known as the Quilting Ladies/Bible Study. The small group format provides a non-threatening entry point for unchurched or the curious to meet others with shared interests or needs; produces more effective communication; and promotes the formation of more meaningful relationships.
Guest - Lorella Rouster on Monday, 10 December 2012 22:36

Small groups are being used effectively in Congo as a part of larger congregations. They have proven to be effective in neighborhood evangelism and in leadership development. They are less threatening than a larger, more formal church setting for many people.

Small groups are being used effectively in Congo as a part of larger congregations. They have proven to be effective in neighborhood evangelism and in leadership development. They are less threatening than a larger, more formal church setting for many people.
Pastor Dave Smuin on Monday, 10 December 2012 22:35

I whole-heartedly agree! I have always considered small groups the Church. Many needs can be met by the people in small groups. If they can't, then the group leader should have the information on hand to see where to go next. This takes huge weights off the the senior pastor and his staff.

I have suggested to every youth leader that I have had an opportunity to talk with to do small groups. When my wife and I led a small group with highschoolers, we became part of their lives. We had a drawer in the refridgerator just for them. Some would stop by the house just to get a can of soda or whatever. We grew so close to those kids they would run across the mall just to say hi!

In one small group we took care of one of the members who had ALS until Hospice took over.

Small groups are the Church.

Ron

I whole-heartedly agree! I have always considered small groups the Church. Many needs can be met by the people in small groups. If they can't, then the group leader should have the information on hand to see where to go next. This takes huge weights off the the senior pastor and his staff. I have suggested to every youth leader that I have had an opportunity to talk with to do small groups. When my wife and I led a small group with highschoolers, we became part of their lives. We had a drawer in the refridgerator just for them. Some would stop by the house just to get a can of soda or whatever. We grew so close to those kids they would run across the mall just to say hi! In one small group we took care of one of the members who had ALS until Hospice took over. Small groups are the Church. Ron
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